OpEd: The Future of Water Needs Plumbers

OpEd: The Future of Water Needs Plumbers
Advertisement
Anew Banner Advertisement

Loading

OpEd: The Future of Water Needs Plumbers (Chicago, IL) — If you want to see the future of water, visit the Plumbers Local 130 Union Training Center located at 1400 W Washington Blvd in downtown Chicago, and ask your childrens’ science and technology teachers to consider taking their next class field trip there. Why? Sustainable water management and climate resilience for our region start here.  This facility is built to inspire the next generation of plumbers with a photovoltaic power supply, green roof, and onsite greywater recycling and rainwater harvesting system, solar-vacuum-tube water heaters and tankless water heaters of any brand they are able to get their hands on. The training center focuses on the plumber’s role in protecting public health with education and training on backflow prevention, cross-connection, and water quality associated with multiple system plumbed buildings including rainwater harvesting, greywater recycling, decentralized water reuse for black water recycling, and condensate reuse. The future of water has arrived in New York City at the Domino Sugar redevelopment where a decentralized on-site black-water water recycling cycle has removed 11 acres and five buildings from the old combined sewer system and eliminated site contributions to combined sewer overflows. It’s too bad that the lack of water policy in Illinois is a barrier to implementing that technology here. A little water policy will go a long way towards clean water and climate resilience.

Advertisement
John Heiderschedit, Criminal Defense Attorney; Subscription Lawyer; Chicago Lawyer

OpEd: The Future of Water Needs Plumbers

Advertisement

Related Articles

The Climate Crisis Is Worse Than You Can Imagine. Here’s What Happens If You Try.

Loading

The Climate Crisis Is Worse Than You Can Imagine. Here’s What Happens If You Try. – Peter Kalmus, out of his mind, stumbled back toward the car. It was all happening. All the stuff he’d been trying to get others to see, and failing to get others to see — it was all here. The day before, when his family started their Labor Day backpacking trip along the oak-lined dry creek bed in Romero Canyon, in the mountains east of Santa Barbara, the temperature had been 105 degrees. Now it was 110 degrees, and under his backpack, his “large mammalian self,” as Peter called his body, was more than just overheating. He was melting down. Everything felt wrong. His brain felt wrong and the planet felt wrong, and everything that lived on the planet felt wrong, off-kilter, in the wrong place.

Responses

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *