Lt. Governor Stratton’s Statement on the Passing of Colin Powell

Lt. Governor Stratton's Statement on the Passing of Colin Powell
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Lt. Governor Stratton’s Statement on the Passing of Colin Powell (Chicago, IL) — Today, our nation mourns the passing of General Colin Powell, a man who lived an amazing American journey. General Powell showed the country how we could make an impact if we hold onto what we believe in.

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Elect David Sheppard

He was the child of Jamaican immigrants, educated at public schools in New York City, where he fell in love with history and politics. He turned this love into passionate service to our country, becoming a four-star general, the first Black Secretary of State, and a trusted advisor to U.S. Presidents from both parties.

General Powell earned many awards and honors, but above all, we must remember his ideals about service to a country working to be its best, just, and equitable for all residents. His legacy will live on for the best and brightest who join our military and the children of immigrants who will know that great things are possible in this country.

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Monica Gordon for Cook County Commissioner

He exemplified what it means to strive for the American Dream and work to ensure others can make their dreams come true, too. May we lean on each other and heal from this incredible loss as a nation by following his lead.

Lt. Governor Stratton’s Statement on the Passing of Colin Powell

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