Disney100: The Exhibition Extended to March 17 in Chicago—Birthplace of Walt Disney

Disney100: The Exhibition Extended to March 17 in Chicago—Birthplace of Walt Disney
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Disney100: The Exhibition Extended to March 17 in Chicago—Birthplace of Walt Disney (Chicago, IL) — The Walt Disney Archives and Semmel Exhibitions, a worldwide exhibit presenter and producer, presents Disney100: The Exhibition at the 35,000-square-foot Exhibition Hub Art Center (formerly known as the Windy City Fieldhouse) in Chicago. Tickets are on sale now https://disney100exhibit.com/chicago/.

Visitors will be taken on a visual journey where they can explore seldom-viewed works of art, including visual development drawings for Sleeping Beauty (1959), created by artist and Disney Legend Marc Davis. A very special piece of art from Mary Poppins (1964), which can also be seen in the opening titles of Mary Poppins Returns (2018), created by artist and Disney Legend Peter Ellenshaw, will also be on display. Also included in the experience are some of the iconic props from various films, such as the Mad Hatter’s teapot from Alice in Wonderland (2010); the poisoned caramel apple from Enchanted (2007) used by Timothy Spall and Amy Adams, and the dinglehopper from The Little Mermaid (2023) used by Halle Bailey. Fans won’t want to miss seeing Disneyland Park Employee Badge #1, issued to Walt Disney in 1955, and early photography of Walt Disney’s birthplace in Chicago. Disney enthusiasts will have the chance to leave with both memories and memorabilia, as the exhibition will include several extraordinary backdrops and photo opportunities along with exclusive merchandise offered inside the Disney100: The Exhibition gift shop.

“It took several years to plan and assemble the artifacts for Disney100: The Exhibition, and many of them will be on display for Disney fans for the first time,” said Christoph Scholz, Director of Semmel Exhibitions. “Most of the artifacts are presented from the Walt Disney Archives collection with some additional treasures from Marvel Studios, the Pixar Living Archives, the Walt Disney Animation Research Library, and Walt Disney Imagineering, including some that will be displayed for the first time in Chicago.”

“We are incredibly excited to bring this fantastic exhibition to Chicago,” said Rebecca Cline, Director Walt Disney Archives. “We can’t wait for guests to experience some of their favorite Disney stories, characters, and attractions in new and immersive ways as we celebrate all the wonderful worlds of Disney.”

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The show is presented in partnership with Exhibition Hub and Fever, both leaders in global live entertainment operations. Guests can experience ten immersive galleries with visual, audio, and interactive elements, as well as more than 250 unique and rarely seen works of art, artifacts, memorabilia, costumes, and props from the historical collections across the many realms of Disney, all on display as The Walt Disney Company celebrates its centennial anniversary on October 16, 2023.

Tickets are on sale now https://disney100exhibit.com/chicago/.

Disney100: The Exhibition Extended to March 17 in Chicago—Birthplace of Walt Disney

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