Country Club Hills Woman Asks City to Turn Up Heat In Her Fight With HOA

Country Club Hills Woman Asks City to Turn Up Heat In Her Fight With HOA
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Country Club Hills Woman Asks City to Turn Up Heat In Her Fight With HOA (Country Club Hills, IL) — A Country Club Hills woman’s blood is getting hotter as the weather gets colder while she battles her homeowner’s association to get a new furnace installed in her unit.

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Prairie State College
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Prairie State College

Helen Myers, of the 19400 block of Cypress Drive, speaking in public comments during Monday night’s Country Club Hills city council meeting, asked the city for help as she wends her way through insurance paperwork and other red tape in her quest to have heat before winter hits.

Myers said she’s been in contact with county and state agencies about how to force her HOA to allow her to do the work. One option she was given was to have the HOA cited for code violations, which she said she was asking the city to do.

Mayor James Ford responded that the city doesn’t get involved in private matters between homeowners and HOAs, but asked Myers to speak with him after the meeting.

After the meeting, Aaron Jones, building commissioner for the city, said he’s had prior problems with the property management at Myers’ complex. He said he would talk with management and see how he could help Myers.

In other business:

Edward Glispie was sworn in as fire commissioner; Michael Perry was sworn in as police commissioner; and Pastor James King, United Christian Church, was sworn in as pastoral commissioner.

Country Club Hills Woman Asks City to Turn Up Heat In Her Fight With HOA

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Monica Gordon for Cook County Commissioner

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