Chicago Heights City Council Moves to Help Local Companies Stay Afloat and Attract New Business

Chicago Heights City Council Moves to Help Local Companies Stay Afloat and Attract New Business
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Chicago Heights City Council Moves to Help Local Companies Stay Afloat and Attract New Business (Chicago Heights, IL) — The Chicago Heights City Council Wednesday night passed a number of ordinances intended to help city businesses stay open and attract new business to the city.

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Morgan Li, a manufacturer of custom fixtures and furniture for the retail and hospitality industries, was the first on the agenda. A family-owned and operated business, Morgan Li has been a fixture 383 E. 16th St. in Chicago Heights for more than 70 years. The city approved an application by the company for a Cook County Class 6B (SERS) Tax classification.

Jack Hynes, Economic Development Consultant with the Chicago Heights Economic Development Corporation, explained to the council that once it approved the ordinance, Morgan Li’s application would go to the Cook County Board for review. If approved, Morgan Li would see a reduction in taxes at the county level, but Chicago Heights would still receive its share to cover the cost of providing services such as police, fire and water.

Named one of Crain’s Chicago’s 50 Fastest-Growing companies in 2020 for the third consecutive year, Morgan Li pivoted during the pandemic to offering schools personal protective equipment such as portable barriers, stand-alone dividers, hands-free door openers and social distancing floor decals.

The council then approved the renewal of a Cook County Class B tax classification for Food4Less, 1333 Western Ave. Hynes told the council that if Food4Less did not receive the renewal, its tax bill would increase by about 60 percent.

The council also approved three separate ordinances granting 60-day purchase-option agreements for city-owned real estate.

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An option for the land at 2116 State St. was submitted by 303 State Street, LLC. Hynes said 303 State Street has a good track record in the city, operating K&S Tire Recycling, Inc., which is becoming one of the largest in the area. Hynes said 303 State Street has been in talks with Union Pacific Railroad about providing a rail line to the site, and the railroad would be more willing to talk with the developer if it had an ownership stake in the land.

Grand Capital N.A., LLC submitted an option for the land at 560 and 570 W. 14th St. Mayor David Gonzales said that a water main ran underneath one of the buildings there, and a break in the main meant that city workers had to under the building to work on the pipes. Hynes said that the developer would address that issue and pay for the moving of the water main.

Star Chamber Investment Group, LLC submitted an option for the land at 711 W. 15th St. Hynes said that Star Chamber held a craft grow cannabis license with the state of Illinois and is considering the site for a cannabis operation.

In his report to the city council, Les Swintek, city finance director, told the council that the 2021 estimated tax levy would be posted for public viewing, as required by law, before it is voted on in December. He said the tax levy is zero percent.

Chicago Heights City Council Moves to Help Local Companies Stay Afloat and Attract New Business

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